sea_legacy SeaLegacy #TurningTheTide

We're on a mission to create healthy and abundant oceans. Founded by @PaulNicklen & @CristinaMittermeier.
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Photo by // Most of the world - except for ocean enthusiasts - have no clue what a manta ray is, let alone that it’s vulnerable. Unlike stingrays, mantas are not dangerous. Instead, they are highly social and gentle creatures. As trivial as it might seem, slight shifts in public perception can subconsciously affect efforts to save vulnerable species. Manta rays (and their relatives the mobula rays) are under threat because targeted fishing programs around the world are harvesting them in unsustainable numbers. Instead of their meat, fisherman are usually after them for their gill rakers, which these animals use to collect food such as plankton. The gill rakers are in high demand in Chinese markets because they’re believed to cure a wide variety of ailments — from chickenpox and cancer. with

6411 36 Jan 18, 2018

Photo by // The government is proposing to increase the wolf trapping season on Vancouver Island in a misguided attempt to preserve deer populations, lengthening the season to 10 months out of the year despite a lack of scientific evidence. The B.C. government is still not recognizing the coastal wolves of Vancouver Island as genetically distinct and globally rare, nor the highly social nature of these family groups or packs. Leg hold traps are inhumane, cruel and should be banned. If you want to help, join and in letting the B.C. Fish and Wildlife Branch know you oppose the NDP government proposal to lengthen the wolf trapping season on Vancouver Island. Click the link in our bio for an online letter to send. The deadline is January 19th. Alternatively, the mailing address is: B.C. Fish and Wildlife Operations, 2080A Labieux Road, Nanaimo, V9T 6J9. Alternatively, you could call them at (250) 751-3100 or email directly at premier

9692 60 Jan 17, 2018

Photo by // The true cost of your sushi roll. Victims of the tuna industry, a vessel encircled a school of tuna, also trapping 128 sharks. Unceremoniously strung up by the tail and discarded dead and dying back to the ocean. Bycatch is the capture of non-target fish and ocean wildlife, including what is brought to port and what is discarded at sea, dead or dying. Bycatch is one of the biggest threats to the oceans and has contributed to over fishing and the dramatic decline of fish populations around the world. Commercial fisheries bring in approximately 160 billion pounds of marine catch around the world each year. Recent estimates indicate as much as 40 percent of global catch is discarded overboard. Anything can be bycatch: the dolphins, sharks, whales, that are encircled to bring you canned tuna and sushi, the sea turtles caught to bring you shrimp, the flounder thrown overboard to put seared scallops on the menu, the endangered whales migrating thousands of miles only to become entangled for the sake of lobster bisque, and the millions of pounds of halibut or cod that are wasted when fishermen have already reached their quota. Much of this captured wildlife is treated as waste, thrown overboard dead or dying. This conservation problem must be solved to ensure healthy oceans into the future.

11725 562 Jan 17, 2018

Photo by // A Chinese longliner crew hooks a highly endangered Yellowfin tuna. How fish are caught also affects their sustainability. Longlining can be especially devastating because it involves one line that can have 3,000 baited hooks and stretch for up to 50 miles (80.5 kilometers). The hooks dangle at a depth between 328 feet (100 meters) and 492 feet (150 meters), where the largest tuna—such as the threatened bluefin—tend to swim. The hooks also catch more than 80 kinds of nontargeted creatures, including endangered sea turtles, which often die on the line before the fishing vessel reels in the catch.

10169 407 Jan 17, 2018

Photo by // The government is proposing to increase the wolf trapping season on Vancouver Island in a misguided attempt to preserve deer populations, lengthening the season to 10 months out of the year despite a lack of scientific evidence. The B.C. government is still not recognizing the coastal wolves of Vancouver Island as genetically distinct and globally rare, nor the highly social nature of these family groups or packs. Leg hold traps are inhumane, cruel and should be banned. If you want to help, join and in letting the B.C. Fish and Wildlife Branch know you oppose the NDP government proposal to lengthen the wolf trapping season on Vancouver Island. Click the link in our bio for an online letter to send. The deadline is January 19th. Alternatively, the mailing address is: B.C. Fish and Wildlife Operations, 2080A Labieux Road, Nanaimo, V9T 6J9. Alternatively, you could call them at (250) 751-3100.

25289 202 Jan 16, 2018

Photo by // The Great Bear Rainforest on Canada’s West Coast is the home of the elusive Kermode or Spirit Bear, a subspecies of the American black bear that, due to a recessive gene, has a white or cream-coloured fur that makes it unique. At low tide, the bears stick close to the coastal tideline, where mussels and barnacles are to be found on rocks and dead trees are exposed to the elements. Kermode bears love snacking on shellfish, to the bear, it’s a little like snacking on crunchy potato chips during Happy Hour.

20078 82 Jan 16, 2018

Photo by // The Gardens of the Queen (‘Jardines de la Reina’ in Spanish) is possibly one of the last relatively intact reef habitats in all the Caribbean. Whereas most of the reefs in the region have been severely overfished and/or destroyed, this area hosts and astonishing abundance and diversity of corals and marine life. Spanning 840 square miles of islands, reefs and mangroves, this remote archipelago located 60 miles to south of the main island of Cuba, has been a strictly protected marine reserve since 1996. And the results of this bold conservation effort are staggering. In the mangroves and sea grasses, American crocodiles lie motionless, with only their eyes breaking the calm surface. Sometimes they’ll come in for a close encounter to check you out! with

15971 48 Jan 15, 2018

Photo by // In a massive win for the orcas, fisheries, and people of Norway, the Lofoten region has been protected from oil and gas exploration. SeaLegacy ran a massive campaign during the presidential election and urged both candidates not to open the region to invasive petroleum industries until “at least 2021.” While the fight is far from over, we are proud to announce the pressure and the Norwegian public applied has resulted in further protection. This is how conservation works. This is what results look like. Thank you to all of our supporters and to Norwegian prime minister

27122 210 Jan 15, 2018

Photo by // $16,000 of hardware waiting for one of nature’s most majestic apex predators to walk by. If camera tripods and long lenses were the only infrastructure impeding on the Arctic and its animals, we’d be happy.

28686 126 Jan 15, 2018

Photo by // Polar bears’ reproductive rate is among the lowest of all mammals. Females reach maturity at the age of four- to five-years-old and usually give birth to two cubs. Mortality is high during the cubs’ first year of life, and depends largely on the mother’s health. Cubs will stay with their mother for two and a half to three years. Bears can live anywhere from 20 to 30 years. That means a typical female will have five or six litters during her lifetime, of which two in three cubs will die within their first two years. With such a slow-to-reproduce animal, bad polar bear management could have dramatic consequences on their numbers. Mother bears and their cubs generally emerge from their dens in March or April, when the cubs are strong enough to survive outdoors and are ready to make the trek to the ice. This period also coincides with the seals’ birthing season on the pack ice — easy meals for the mother bears who have been fasting for as long as eight months at this point.

39904 198 Jan 14, 2018

Photo by // Steller’s sea lions sharing sea stars in the Salish Sea. It’s not a tongue-twister. It’s an experience not to be missed for Pacific Northwest divers. These playful pinnipeds should be approached with caution and given due respect, like any wild animal.

26978 88 Jan 13, 2018

Photo by // The dramatic skyline of a jagged mountain range towers above a beautiful Svalbard scene. We watched this big, healthy polar bear wandering through ultralight, cold powder snow. It was like a scene out of Narnia. with and

25576 93 Jan 12, 2018