juanarre Juan Arredondo

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/01/colombia-civil%20war-farc-guerillas-peace/
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In February 2000, when members of a paramilitary group massacred townspeople in El Salado, one victim was Miguel Ángel Contreras. His father, Jesús Contreras, has not visited El Salado since. Now 86, blind, and deaf, he lives with his daughter in Shot on assignment this month's issue of 'The healing of Colombia' with text by Alma Guillermoprieto. To see more about Colombia or to learn more about the changes that are taking place. Follow me on instragram

1125 13 Jan 16, 2018

So long Cuba! You will always have a special place in my heart

876 9 Jan 13, 2018

( ) ・・・ Photograph by (Juan Arredondo) Tourist and visitors enjoy the panoramic view from the rooftop of a Hotel located in the exclusive neighborhood of El Poblado in Medellin typifies the growing nightlife and appeal of the city. It's a dramatic change from the violent days under Escobar's Medellin Cartel, which brought the city to be the most dangerous city in the world at one point. After 52 years of internal conflict, this hopeful nation seek a lasting peace and new opportunities. Shot on assignment this month's issue of 'The healing of Colombia' with text by Alma Guillermoprieto. To see more about Colombia or to learn more about the changes that are taking place. Follow me on instragram

1208 57 Jan 10, 2018

( ) ・・・ Photograph by (Juan Arredondo) FARC fighters of the southern block stand at attention. After the cease-fire on June 22, 2016, FARC were allowed to wear casual, even brightly colored, clothing instead of the camouflage gear used in jungle warfare. In early 2017, 26 transitional and normalization zones were built to help an estimated 7,000 fighters transition into civilian life. This image was shot for this month's issue of 'The healing of Colombia' with text by Alma Guillermoprieto. Follow me to see more about the changes Colombia is undergoing. process

800 38 Jan 6, 2018

A pit full is plastic balls at La Octava bar typifies Medellin’s growing nightlife and tourists appeal. It’s a dramatic change from the violent days under Escobar’s Medellín cartel, which at its height brought in as much as four billion dollars a year in cocaine trade. Shot on assignment for my first feature article for this month's issue of

1137 56 Jan 4, 2018

( ) ・・・ Photograph by (Juan Arredondo) Pedestrians watch a wedding party’s arrival at the Church of San Pedro Claver, in the historic district of Cartagena. The resort city’s Spanish colonial charms are a boon for tourism, which the government says has risen 250 percent in Colombia since 2006. A peace accord has ended the fighting but the countryside is littered with land mines and criminal gangs are growing reclaiming territories left by FARC demobilized rebels. These are some of the challenges this hopeful nation faces after five decades of Civil War. My first feature assignment in this month’s issue of with text by Alma Guillermoprieto. Follow me to see more about the challenges and changes Colombia is undergoing. process

896 32 Jan 4, 2018

Photograph by for Esperanza Medina, 40, holds her newborn, Desiree Paz, at a FARC camp at La Guajira, on the border with Venezuela, in January 2017. Medina joined the group when she was 14 and had her first child at 16, but FARC commanders forced her to give up the baby for adoption. Medina subsequently underwent seven abortions, but now that the fighting is over, she hopes to be able to raise Desiree herself. Esperanza named her Daugher Desiree Paz (Desire for peace) a mix of French and Spanish name, for her wish to raise her daughter in a peaceful country. In January 2 Desiree will be a year old also making almost a year since Esperanza and her 59th Front of FARC demobilized. Esperanza and thousand of former fighters now face the challenges of reintegrating into a society that stigmatize them. Part of this story was shot for for the January issue. talks # hope

719 13 Dec 30, 2017

Rio Caquetá, Amazon, Colombia

589 4 Dec 27, 2017

El Salado, Bolivar. Colombia. A boy plays with a ballon in a dilapidated part of the Town of El Salado. Once a prosperous tobacco farming town, was the scene of Colombia's deadliest massacre. The killing of El Salado lasted six days from February 16 to 21 of 2000. By the end there 66 people killed and the remaining 4,000 residents fled, joining more than 2 million other internally displaced Colombians at the time. With the efforts of its leaders, the residents returned despite the presence of FARC. Today El Salado and it's residents are transforming their grim past. This picture was taken as part of the coverage for the January issue for magazine about Colombia and the challenges ahead for this nation after the signing of the peace agreement between the Colombian Government and FARC putting and end of over 50 years of internal conflict. creative

429 12 Dec 25, 2017

Buenaventura, Valle del Cauca, Colombia. Members of the Wounaan Indigenous group took shelter at a local school in the city of Buenaventura after they forcibly displaced by illegal armed groups that started to make presence in their territory, intimidating and forced recruitment of minors. A Total of 66 families made the four-hour journey by boat to seek assistance from governmental assistance. A total of 2083 families, 7477 of people (3114 Afro Colombians, 3035 Indigenous, 1234 peasants, 84 Urban population) and total of 44 massive displacements as of July of 2017. Coverage for the upcoming issue for magazine about Colombia and the challenges ahead after the peace signing process.

232 1 Dec 23, 2017

The Healing of Colombia is now available online with text by Alma Guillermoprieto and photos by - An airplane replica of the drug lord Pablo Escobar used for smuggling cocaine adorns the entrance of Hacienda Napoles. His once lavish estate is now a theme park with animal exhibits, waterslides and dinosaur statutes. There has been a revived interest by tourist into the life of Pablo Escobar, in part fueled by the recent tv series and video games. Narco tours are now common in Medellin where you can be taken to his grave and the jailed he once built for himself. But times are now different, and after 52 years of civil war, this hopeful nation seeks a lasting peace and new opportunities. - My first assignment for for the upcoming January issue. Link to the entire story in my Instagram Bio.

312 7 Dec 21, 2017