ciriljazbec Ciril Jazbec

National Geographic photographer / based in Slovenia / Leica Camera / Arctic stories / NEW story about Africa TECH in December @NatGeo
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Samburu women wear their traditional clothing to show their pride in being educated and going to school. Published this week in story 'In Rural Africa, Tablets Revolutionize the Classroom'. BRCK tablets are opening up new learning opportunities for the Samburu tribe women and children in the Kenyan reserve. Follow link in my profile to read the entire story and see more photos!

9424 100 Jan 11, 2018

This is the new downtown of Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, which is rising and expanding fast, from the rooftop of a hotel. Investing in the future, Rwanda has pledged to educate students about the digital world, connect its citizens to the Internet, and build a knowledge-­based economy by 2020. Follow the link in my profile to read 'How Africa's Tech Generation Is Changing the Continent'.

2382 26 Dec 18, 2017

The desire to teach their children about computers drew these Samburu women to a classroom in a settlement north of Nairobi. They are learning about tablets—designed to withstand tough use—that connect to the Internet through a satellite and come preloaded with educational programs. Technology now has arrived in isolated regions of Africa primarily in the form of relatively inexpensive cell phones. This photo was also featured by the magazine’s photo editors in the best photos of 2017. Follow the link in my profile to read 'How Africa's Tech Generation Is Changing the Continent'.

7550 108 Dec 18, 2017

Designing for Africa is the objective of many new technology ventures. The continent is still a largely untapped market, particularly in remote, off-the-grid places. director of user-experience design for BRCK in Nairobi, Kenya’s capital, holds a prototype for a mobile weather station. My new feature Magazine story is out after almost 2 years of production and several trips to Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda. Follow link in my profile to read 'How Africa's Tech Generation Is Changing the Continent'.

1677 6 Dec 14, 2017

Photographed on assignment for the current issue of . Developers Eric Caleb and from South Sudan are testing Virtual Reality. As a small startup they have limited resources, they can’t afford the office rent and fast internet connection, which is why the , an Innovation hub and a hacker space for the technology community in Nairobi, is essential for them. The hub has been the main catalyst for East African tech acceleration and a role model for other hubs. Follow link in my profile to read the entire story.

1840 16 Dec 13, 2017

Delivering blood units all over Rwanda with drones. Building tech capacity, Rwanda partnered with Zipline to deliver blood and plasma units inside drones, creating technical jobs for people like flight operator Olivier Mugiraneza. Olivier here on the first photo recovers a drone just after delivery of blood to a remote hospital. Zipline is a blood delivery system by drones in remote parts of Rwanda. It delivers on demand blood and plasma units to hospitals immediately after being reqeusted. Blood used to take hours to drive to remote hospitals. Now it happens in minutes. Follow link in my profile to read 'How Africa's Tech Generation Is Changing the Continent'. Published in Magazine all over the world in December!

3748 63 Nov 30, 2017

My new feature Magazine story is out after almost 2 years of production and several trips to Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda. Thankful that helped me tell a different and positive story from Africa. Aspiring to protect the environment through innovative technology, Jessica Chege is studying computer technology in college near Nairobi. She first became interested in computers when she was 10 years old. Follow link in my profile to read 'How Africa's Tech Generation Is Changing the Continent'. Can’t wait to see it in print when it comes out in December all around the globe.

2808 42 Nov 23, 2017

On our way to Aappilattoq, a small settlement in the northwest Greenland we had to sail through the melting ice. I was traveling with Niels, a local fisherman and hunter. He told me life had become much harder due to climate change with fishing and hunting forming the foundation of the Inuit world. The Greenland’s massive ice sheet, almost two miles deep in some places, has been melting faster than at any time during the past 50 years.

4166 25 Nov 14, 2017

Earlier this year I was fortunate to finally visit Qaanaaq, one of the most remote towns in Greenland. I was very lucky to stay at Navarana’s house and collaborate with her on my project. She is a descendant of a shaman, an Inughuit elder, and a professional interpreter. She helped me open many doors inside the community. It is all about trust and respect when you are in the field working on a documentary project. One time she asked me to take a portrait of her and while I was changing a roll of film she quickly updated her Facebook about our photo shoot with her wearing traditional clothing.

5572 48 Nov 13, 2017

Greenlandic dog is not a pet dog but a working dog that Inuit hunters and fishermen use for dog-sledding. They are the least know casualties of climate change. With the disappearance of sea ice, they have become a burden, which is why some hunters are forced to shoot them. It is too expensive to sustain and feed them throughout the year when they can only use them for shorter and shorter periods of time. I took this portrait while crossing the frozen sea on my way to Siorapaluk, one of the northernmost settlement on the planet.

15433 163 Nov 13, 2017

The initially planned one-night stopover in Upernavik, a town in northwestern Greenland, suddenly extended in a five-day stay, when my flight with national airline further up north was cancelled due to bad weather. There was nothing to be done but adapt to the situation. Travelling around Greenland really teaches you how to be patient and deal with mother nature. So I spent time exploring the town and often visited the harbour where local children like to play by jumping over containers. Towns in Greenland receive goods and some basic food supplies with container ships when there is no sea ice.

2219 9 Nov 12, 2017

One of the few places where ice from the Greenland ice cap enters the sea, Sermeq Kujalleq or Jakobshavn is one of the fastest (19 m per day) and most active glaciers in the world. It annually calves over 35 km3 of ice, i.e. 10% of the production of all Greenland calf ice and more than any other glacier outside Antarctica. This photo was taken during a boat trip in the Ilulissat Icefjord. Seeing the glacier so close up was mesmerizing and so was picturing the further magnitudes below and inside by itself a gigantic sight.

8353 58 Nov 6, 2017